Ukraine. Expert says New Zealand’s actions against Russian invasion are ‘of global significance’

An international relations expert said that although New Zealand is small, the government’s position on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is still of global importance.

Russian President Vladimir Putin sent troops to breakaway regions of Ukraine this week, a move that has seen world leaders sanction Russia in hopes of averting all-out war in Europe.

Professor Bethan Greener of Massey University said that despite the size of this country, calling the Russian ambassador on Wednesday was “still in fact an act of global significance”.

Professor Bethan Greener thinks that although New Zealand is a small country, his actions are still relevant. "global significance".

Provided / Stuff

Professor Bethan Greener believes that although New Zealand is a small country, its actions still have “global significance”.

“The appeal to the ambassador is highly symbolic in foreign policy and is one of the strongest diplomatic signals the government has, short of other more forceful steps that may now be on the table,” Greener said. .

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Greener said Russia’s annual exports to New Zealand amounted to just $250 million, but the sanctions would still be symbolic “by adding weight to international censorship”.

Georgii Zuev, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to New Zealand, arriving at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

DAVID WHITE/STUFF

Georgii Zuev, Ambassador of the Russian Federation to New Zealand, arriving at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Dr Evgeny Pavlov of the University of Canterbury felt New Zealand’s response to the Russian invasion was adequate.

Dr Evgeny Pavlov said there were no sanctions New Zealand could impose, which would have a lot of consequences for Russia.  (File photo)

Provided / Stuff

Dr Evgeny Pavlov said there were no sanctions New Zealand could impose, which would have a lot of consequences for Russia. (File photo)

“The country has expressed its strong support for Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and made it clear that it sides with its allies in its view of the situation.

“At this stage, there are no sanctions that New Zealand could realistically impose that would have a lot of consequences for Russia,” said the head of the UC’s global, cultural and linguistic studies department. .

Sanctions imposed by the United States and European countries have largely targeted Putin’s inner circle and financial elite.

President Joe Biden speaks on Ukraine in the Roosevelt Room of the White House.

Alex Brandon/AP

President Joe Biden speaks on Ukraine in the Roosevelt Room of the White House.

Pavlov said footage from Tuesday’s Russian Security Council meeting, where Putin embarrassed his spy chief, showed he was making all the decisions alone and any guesses about the future of the crisis depended on his judgment .

“The Russian public will probably support his actions now – partly because no real military confrontation has taken place so far. Russian propaganda channels will try to get as much support as possible and, on the whole, I think opinion polls would indicate that the majority would agree with recognizing ‘republics’,” he said.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow.

Alexei Nikolsky/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow.

Stephen Hoadley, an associate professor at the University of Auckland, said there was no doubt New Zealand would side with the West and Mahuta would engineer New Zealand’s response with allies.

“Whether the rhetoric will be followed by meaningful action is the next question to answer,” Hoadley said.

Associate Professor Stephen Hoadley of the University of Auckland said Putin wanted to keep the West

Provided

Associate Professor Stephen Hoadley of the University of Auckland said Putin wanted to keep the West “unbalanced”. (File photo)

Hoadley opined that Putin was deliberately ambiguous to keep the West “off balance”.

Hoadley said sanctions can also be costly for the sanctioning country, which would make countries reluctant to place them, such as, he said, with Germany’s reluctance to cancel the Nord Stream Two gas pipeline since the Russia.

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