Parents worried about APS “lack of communication”

Albuquerque Public School parents are growing increasingly frustrated with the increase in reported threats and pranks, especially this year. The most recent incident occurred on Monday afternoon at Sandia High School, located in the northeast zone. was fine, but everyone was freaking out and having panic attacks,” said freshman Gabriella Trujillo. A shelter-in-place order was lifted after Albuquerque police responded to a fight at the school that may have involved a gun. Officers later found no evidence of gunfire and no one was injured. “I had PE, so we walked in and over the intercom they were saying there was a lockdown,” Trujillo said. One parent said communication was lacking from school officials that day, and other times before. School officials say there has been an increase in hoaxes, threats and unconfirmed reports of weapons on campus. “We need to be informed as parents,” Cassandra said. “It makes it even scarier to send your child to school when there is no communication between the school and the parents.” Another parent emailed KOAT about the incident. She said her high school student Sandia was picked up from a nearby business that Monday, after he and several students fled the school. She is now considering home schooling options for her son, something Cassandra has been thinking about a lot lately. “If I didn’t love school so much, I would honestly take it out and just do it as an extracurricular activity outside of school to still have the socialization,” she said. APS officials say school safety remains a priority for the administration. At last Thursday’s press conference, Chef Steve Gallegos spoke about the protocols and shared a new training video for students and staff. Yet almost nothing was mentioned about the school system’s communication process. “The most significant change regarding school safety has been the way we train for emergency events on campus, particularly active fire events,” said Gallegos, unit chief of Albuquerque Public School Police. .KOAT contacted Monica Armenta, a spokeswoman for APS, for an interview. She declined and instead guided viewers to an article about school safety. It can be found on the APS website here.

Albuquerque Public School parents are growing increasingly frustrated with the increase in reported threats and pranks, especially this year.

The most recent incident occurred on Monday afternoon at Sandia High School, located in the northeast zone.

“I got out and everyone started running. I was fine, but everyone was freaking out and having panic attacks,” said freshman Gabriella Trujillo.

A shelter-in-place order was lifted after Albuquerque police responded to a fight at school that may have involved a gun.

Officers later found no evidence of gunshots and no one was injured.

“I had PE, so we walked in and over the intercom they were saying there was a lockdown,” Trujillo said.

A parent said there was a lack of communication from school officials that day and at other times before.

“There were several times when we were late informed of possible threats,” said Cassandra Trujillo, Gabriella’s mother.

Unfortunately, this is a new reality for schools in Albuquerque.

School officials say there has been an increase in hoaxes, threats and unconfirmed reports of weapons on campus.

“We need to be informed as parents,” Cassandra said. “It makes it even scarier to send your child to school when there is no communication between the school and the parents.”

Another parent emailed KOAT about the incident. She said her high school student Sandia was picked up from a nearby business that Monday, after he and several students fled the school.

She is now considering home schooling options for her son, something Cassandra has been thinking about a lot lately.

“Whether [Gabriella] didn’t like school so much, honestly, I would take it out and just do it as an extracurricular activity outside of school to keep socializing,” she said.

APS officials say school safety remains a priority for the administration.

At last Thursday’s press conference, Chef Steve Gallegos spoke about the protocols and shared a new training video for students and staff.

Yet almost nothing was mentioned about the school system’s communication process.

“The most significant change regarding school safety has been the way we train for emergency events on campus, particularly active fire events,” said Gallegos, unit chief of Albuquerque Public School Police.

KOAT contacted Monica Armenta, a spokeswoman for APS, for an interview.

She declined and instead guided viewers to an article about school safety. It can be found on the APS website here.

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